Posted in science

Is pet food costing the Earth?

Have you ever wondered about your cat’s carbon footprint?

According to researchers at UCLA, meat eaten by cats and dogs in the US creates the equivalent of 64 million tons of carbon dioxide per year – the same climate impact as a year’s worth of driving from 13.6 million cars.

Livestock production required to meet overall US demand produces, on average, the equivalent of 260 million tons of carbon dioxide per year. Of this, between 25 to 30% can be chalked up to the meaty diet of cats and dogs. Currently, our fluffy friends consume around 25% of the animal-derived calories in the US. Incredibly, if the 163 million cats and dogs currently residing in America were to create their own furry country, they would rank fifth in global meat consumption.

Despite having the most pets per capita, this is not just an American issue. As of 2014, it was estimated that 24% of the UK’s population owned a dog and 18% owned a cat – percentages that are echoed by the majority of developed countries. Along with this, as emerging countries such as Brazil and China become more affluent, more people are purchasing pets.

Now, this isn’t to say that we should put our pets on a vegetarian diet. Indeed, doing this would be harmful and unhealthy for them. Getting rid of pets isn’t really an option either. Growing numbers of people consider their pets to be more like family members than animals, and it’s indisputable that pets provide both friendship and a wide variety of other social, health and emotional benefits.

So, how do we solve the problem?

Although the pet food industry is beginning to take steps towards greater sustainability, it will take a while to get there. In the meantime, you could consider getting a vegetarian pet such as a bird, hamster or rabbit in order to cut your carbon footprint.

Of course, if small animals aren’t really your cup of tea, you could always take Professor Gregory Okin’s advice and purchase a tiny horse. As he points out, ‘we’d all get more exercise taking them for walks, and they would also mow the lawn.’

Tabitha Watson

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